Employees at meeting tableA substantial majority of workers don't trust their directsupervisors to give them career advancement opportunitiesand  have considered quitting their jobs in thelast 3 months. (Photo: Getty)

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Happy at work?

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If so, you've got plenty of company, according to the first-everCNBC/SurveyMonkey Workplace Happiness Index. The joint project ispart of CNBC's @Work franchise.

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CNBC reports that the results of this first survey, which aimsto measure how Americans feel about their jobs across five keycategories—pay, opportunities for advancement, recognition, autonomy and meaning—come in at“an optimistic 71” out of 100.

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But that doesn't mean there's no room for improvement. In fact,while 85 percent of the professionals surveyed say they're very orsomewhat satisfied with their jobs, all is not rosy inemployment-land. Just 9 percent of workers thought all 5 categoriesdeserved a top rating. In fact, 27 percent say they are not wellpaid and 30 percent have seriously considered quitting their job in the last 3months.

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While most workers say they're keeping up with tech andinnovation in the workplace, they don't necessarily see themselvesas being on the cutting edge. In fact, just barely a third seethemselves as “ahead of the curve” with tech, but older workersfeel even worse about it. Overall, 60 percent say they are “aboutaverage” in their ability to keep up, while 7 percent seethemselves as falling behind.

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And 27 percent see tech as a threat to their jobs, despite thefact that 71 percent say they trust their direct supervisors toprepare them for tech changes on the job.

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Then there are trust issues, with a substantial majority—65percent—of those not trusting their direct supervisors to give themcareer advancement opportunities saying that they've consideredquitting their jobs in the last 3 months.

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In contrast, just 17 percent of those who say they trust theirsupervisors “a lot” say they've considered quitting.

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Only 69 percent of women say they're well paid, compared with 76percent of men, and only 28 percent of women say that they'remanagers or above, compared with 36 percent of men.

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And when asked “what is the one change that would most improveyour job satisfaction,” 41 percent say “higher salary”; 14 percentwant more training or learning opportunities and even among thosewho admit to being “very well paid,” 18 percent still say a highersalary would most improve their job satisfaction.

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Marlene Satter

Marlene Y. Satter has worked in and written about the financial industry for decades.