Mouse on trap Looking at theproblem of disappearing Social Security benefits from a differentperspective just might reveal that better mousetrap you're lookingfor. (Photo: Shutterstock)

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“Build a better mousetrap and the world will beat a path to yourdoor.” If you have the opportunity to build a better path tosuccess for others, you're likely to become their first stop.

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This promise appeals because it alleviates an annoying anxietythat's perplexing a particular audience: millennials. They nowrepresent the largest segment of the workforce, and they'll be herefor a while. You can count on them sticking around long afteryou've retired.

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Christopher Carosa, CTFA, ischief contributing editor for FiduciaryNews.com, a leading providerof essential news and information, blunt commentary and practicalexamples for ERISA/401(k) fiduciaries, individual trustees andprofessional fiduciaries.

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So, what problem can you solve for them? It's not a currentproblem, like paying off student loans or budgeting to make endsmeet. According to a recent Ernst & Young survey, millennialsare most worried about Social Security not being there inretirement.

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Related: Growing debt will expedite Social Security'sinsolvency, Wharton economists say

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Let's narrow the audience from all millennials to those betweenages 32 and 36 (this represents the oldest of the cohort). They'reabout to enter their prime earning years. They'll soon bediscovering they can accelerate retirement savings to counter theirconcern about Social Security. That's something you can easily showthem.

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Is that the problem you can solve that'll keep them coming backfor more until you're ready to retire? My guess is that this won'tdifferentiate you very much from the competition.

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Looking at this problem from a different perspective, however,just might reveal that better mousetrap you're looking for.

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Nearly three in five women between the age of 32 and 36 alreadyhave children. Do you think they feel Social Security will be therefor their kids? If they can't depend on Social Security forthemselves, imagine what they think about the prospects of thegovernment program existing when their children retire?

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What if you told these millennial parents you could ease thisparticular concern for them? Do you think having one less worryabout their children's future would make them sleep easier atnight?

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Here's the twist that seals the deal: Three out of fivemillennials in that age group have considered starting their ownbusiness. These are the folks to focus on. Why? It's easiest forthis crowd to implement the one strategy that most likely willunshackle their children's retirement from any dependency on SocialSecurity.

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Minor children who work for a parent-owned business are exemptfrom payroll taxes. Let's say they start working for their parentsat age 13 and earn $6,000 a year and continue through their 18thyear. They won't have to pay any federal income taxes. If they putthose six years' worth of earnings in a Roth Child IRA, withoutever putting another cent in, and earning 8 percent a year untilthey retire at age 70, they'll retire with $2.5 milliontax-free.

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That's a major head start on retirement (and not needing SocialSecurity). What parent wouldn't want that?

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Now that's the kind of mousetrap people will beat a path to yourdoor for.

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Christopher Carosa

Chris Carosa has been writing a weekly article and monthly column for BenefitsPRO online and BenefitsPRO Magazine since 2011 and is a nationally recognized award-winning writer, researcher and speaker. He’s written seven books, including From Cradle to Retire: The Child IRA; Hey! What’s My Number? – How to Increase the Odds You Will Retire in Comfort; A Pizza The Action: Everything I Ever Learned About Business I Learned By Working in a Pizza Stand at the Erie County Fair; and the widely acclaimed 401(k) Fiduciary Solutions. Carosa is also Chief Contributing Editor of the authoritative trade journal FiduciaryNews.com and publisher of the Mendon-Honeoye Falls-Lima Sentinel, a weekly community newspaper he founded in 1989. Currently serving as President of the National Society of Newspaper Columnists and with more than 1,000 articles published in various publications, he appears regularly in the national media. A “parallel” entrepreneur, he actively runs a handful of businesses, including a small boutique investment adviser, providing hands-on experience for his writing. A trained astrophysicist, he also holds an MBA and has been designated a Certified Trust and Financial Advisor. Share your thoughts and story ideas with him through Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/christophercarosa/)and Twitter (https://twitter.com/ChrisCarosa).