Health care expendituresVariations as age, marital status, and insurance status can make ittough for employers to find an affordable health insuranceoption that suits their needs. (Image: Shutterstock)

|

They definitely want to see the health care situation improvedat the government level, but small nonprofits are divided overwhether a Medicare for All approach is the right one.

|

So says the Nonprofits on Benefits: 2019 Report fromPeopleKeep, which adds that the top concern at those nonprofits isthat employees get access to a quality health benefit.

|

Eighty-one percent of small nonprofits, according to the report,can't afford to offer their employees health care coverage, andmany of the ones that do offer it have a tough time keeping up withthe cost.

|

Related: New final HRA regulations expand options foremployers

|

In addition, 52 percent say that employees' needs are soindividualized that it makes it tougher to find something that willserve the whole group. Such variations as age, marital status, andinsurance status can make it tough to find something in which onesize sort of fits most—and since employees may also work acrossstate lines, that can add further complications.

|

Then there's time management, which 35 percent say presents anobstacle to offering health care; employees tend to be few but wearmany hats, which can make administering a program difficult if notimpossible. Yet another problem is the need of many nonprofits tocope with unpredictable revenue streams; 27 percent cited that as achallenge to providing health benefits.

|

Small business infographic(Click to enlarge)

|

With so many nonprofits not providing health benefits due tocost, a number of them rely on a qualified small-employer health reimbursement arrangement instead. Thatallows them to reimburse their workers tax-free for medicalexpenses, and 93 percent of the nonprofits using QSEHRAs saythey're “extremely” or “very likely” to recommend such a strategyto others.

|

But they still want the government to act on health care, with68 percent saying that something needs to be done outside grouphealth. And they have suggestions, such as more control overprescription drug cost and more HRA options.

|

The dispute over a Medicare for All policy not only dividesnonprofits, but also runs along types of nonprofits; the third thatsupport a Medicare for All policy tend to be arts organizations andsocial welfare groups (57 percent and 55 percent, respectively,support it) while among those opposing it, 15 percent are religiousorganizations. Twenty-six percent of nonprofits overall oppose aMedicare for All solution.

|

Read more: 

 

Complete your profile to continue reading and get FREE access to BenefitsPRO, part of your ALM digital membership.

  • Critical BenefitsPRO information including cutting edge post-reform success strategies, access to educational webcasts and videos, resources from industry leaders, and informative Newsletters.
  • Exclusive discounts on ALM, BenefitsPRO magazine and BenefitsPRO.com events
  • Access to other award-winning ALM websites including ThinkAdvisor.com and Law.com
NOT FOR REPRINT

© 2024 ALM Global, LLC, All Rights Reserved. Request academic re-use from www.copyright.com. All other uses, submit a request to [email protected]. For more information visit Asset & Logo Licensing.

Marlene Satter

Marlene Y. Satter has worked in and written about the financial industry for decades.