Person emptying wallet Amongsurvey respondents, 43 percent say that their "side jobs" bring inhalf or more of their total income.

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Workers may say they're happy with their current jobs, but thatdoesn't hold water once they're asked about their pay. And they'reburning out at a high rate, with plenty of themworking side jobs or considering adding a gig to their regular employment.

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In fact, according to Skye Learning's second annual Work Confidencestudy, 74 percent of American workers experience burnout, withyounger workers burning out at a noticeably higher rate thanworkers over 45. Despite this, not only are a third already workinga gig job or a side hustle, but 29 percent say they're consideringjoining the gig economy. And almost half of workers say they workbetween 8 and 12 hours a day.

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Related: This year's graduates plan to keep their sidegigs

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Oh, and about that pay: while 74 percent of workers say they'rehappy at their current jobs, with 31 percent claiming to be "veryhappy," many would jump ship if a higher-paying job comes along. Just 62 percentof workers say they're happy with their current salaries, andbosses may be alarmed to hear that only 47 percent say they'd stayat their present jobs if they didn't need the money.

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A lot of them do need the money, with 43 percent saying thattheir "side jobs" bring in half or more of their total income, andeven in this so-called "roaring" economy with its low unemploymentrate, only 82 percent are confident that they'll still be employeda year from now—and that's down from 93 percent last year.

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They're also not confident in the U.S. economy, with only 60percent saying they're very or fairly confident the economy will bein good shape a year from now. Last year, 64 percent wereconfident.

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Among workers experiencing burnout, there are plenty of reasonsfor them to be unhappy: 38 percent report a lack of time for theirpersonal lives, while 26 percent say there's a lack of opportunityfor advancement and 23 percent report a negative workplaceenvironment. In addition, 21 percent say their job expectations areunclear; 14 percent say they have a bad relationship with the boss;11 percent say they don't have enough training to do their jobs; 10percent have bad relationships with coworkers; and 8 percent saythey don't have enough responsibility at work.

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"Taken together, these findings suggest that the Americanworkplace is going through a period of turbulence and uncertainty,"says Sandra Slager, president of Skye Learning. "As digitaltransformation continues to accelerate, it's increasingly importantto build workforce skills that apply in a strong economy, but alsoones that can withstand market changes, enhance workers'satisfaction, and empower people with autonomy in the gigeconomy."

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Marlene Satter

Marlene Y. Satter has worked in and written about the financial industry for decades.