Different generations are expressing their own needs and interests abouthow health care is delivered, according to a survey of 2,016 U.S. adults conducted by OliverWyman, in collaboration with Fortune Knowledge Group.

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While nearly 80 percent of the respondents say their medicalcare is “good or great,” there are differences across thegenerations about their wish lists for health care.

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Millennials are not opposed to paying for high-tech -- and high-touch -- health careexperiences, such as an on-camera visit with a doctor or an appthat enables a consultation with specialists. Social supportmatters just as much as technology, as respondents within thatgenerational groups ranked the desire for an in-person consultationwith a patient advocate expert the same as they ranked the desirefor wearables that monitor their health and wellness. More thanhalf (55 percent) of millennials said their highest-rankinghealth care offering is guaranteed appointments with a specialistwithin a week.

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On the other hand, the highest-rated offering for many Gen Xers-- many of whom have very young children -- is same-dayappointments with a family doctor, while boomers are mostinterested in home visits with a doctor or nurse.

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The “silent generation” -- born between 1925 and 1945 -- requiregreater levels of higher-intensity care, and may also place strainon their boomer or Gen X children/caregivers, according to thesurvey.

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“The days of viewing health care holistically are over,” theauthors write.

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“Health care companies that adopt a universal consumer strategywill face challenges and frustrations because there is nosingle strategy that will meet these varied desires and needs,”they write.

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“Instead, it’s about personalization, seeing the complexity ofthe consumer market, and adopting a multi-faceted consumer’s pointof view -- one that can be executed through a number of differentstrategies.”

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Other survey findings include:

  • Baby boomers are the generation most satisfied with theircurrent health care experience. However, they also are the mostpessimistic about the future. Just 21 percent think their care willget better over the next five years.

  • While they are less open to new products and services thanmillennials, solutions that address boomers’ specific concerns(e.g., fear of losing mobility) could break through theirhesitations.

  • Family caregivers -- people who say they are responsible for thecare of someone else -- are far more likely to be interested inextra health care services, such as access to medical professionalsvia a 24-hour help line or home computer, than those who are notcaregivers.

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Katie Kuehner-Hebert

Katie Kuehner-Hebert is a freelance writer based in Running Springs, Calif. She has more than three decades of journalism experience, with particular expertise in employee benefits and other human resource topics.