Not only are these stereotypes prevalent, but they’re wrong.

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While 81 percent of women report that they’ve experiencedstereotypes about their investing acumen or financial status, theopposite of those stereotypes is true, according to research from Capital Group.

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Not only do respondents report being highly engaged in financialand investing decisions, contributing meaningfully to householdincome and assets and being savvy about their portfolios, they alsobelieve that women as a group have more economic power asinvestors than in the workplace.

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In addition, women maintain higher expectations than men for thecompanies in which they invest, are not risk averse but do wantprotection against market downturns and have a diverse set offinancial and investing concerns that vary by demographic. Sellingthem short is a big mistake.

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“American women are a powerful economic force with $11 trillionof assets,” according to Heather Lord, senior vice president andhead of strategy and innovation at Capital Group.

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In a statement, Lord says, “Women are a complex and varied groupof investors, and they have a clear vision for their investinggoals. They want enough money to retire and to take care ofchildren or aging family members. They want investments thatoutpace the market over time and show resilience in marketdownturns. And more than men, women want to invest in companiesthat are not only financially successful but also deliver economicand social benefits.”

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Not only do 53 percent of women respondents rate themselves asmeaningful contributors to their household income and assets, 52percent say they are always or usually confident they have theknowledge to make good financial and investment decisions.

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In addition, 50 percent of boomer women and 48 percent of femaleGenXers say their top priority outcome is to beat the stock marketover time, while for 51 percent of millennial women it’s to growtheir investments in line with the market.

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As a group, women believe they have more economic power asinvestors than in the workplace: 48 percent say women have a greatdeal of economic power as investors, while only 35 percent believethey have as much power in relation to wages in the workplace.

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Then there are expectations; 94 percent of women, compared with90 percent of men, want the companies they invest in to deliverstrong financial performance in terms of revenues, earnings anddividends per share growth.

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Women investors also believe, by a margin of nine percentagepoints over men, that it’s important for companies they invest into focus on growing U.S. jobs, operations and exports.

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Women are also somewhat more likely than men to invest incompanies that support new technologies and innovation-led growth,and expect companies to promote health and wellness of consumers;help disadvantaged communities; and promote economic opportunityfor women, minorities and LGBT persons by approximately 15percentage points more than men.

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As might be expected, women are also 22 percentage points morelikely than men to emphasize the importance of investing incompanies that put women in senior management and board roles (73percent of women, compared with just 51 percent of men).

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And they’re not timid about investing, either.

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Only 11 percent chose the most conservative option: bank CDs andhigh-quality bonds with little or no money invested in the stockmarket. Instead, the top choice for 30 percent of women and 33percent of men was a mutual fund with a track record of outpacingthe stock market over the long term.

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But that doesn’t mean they’re taking wild risks, either, with 24percent of women investors preferring mutual funds that do betterthan the stock market during downturns, compared to 19 percent ofmen, indicating a somewhat higher interest in downside protectionon the part of women.

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