coach talking to soccer players What you do for fun can be the source of your “naturalmarket.” (Photo: Shutterstock)

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“Go after your natural market.”  Isn’t everyone toldthe same message on Day One?  Yet as we become more andmore successful, we sometimes forget how we becamesuccessful.  We forget that clients often come from situations where thepeople you know already like and trust you.

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When researching my book, “Captivating the Wealthy Investor” Isurveyed financial advisors and asked ”What do you do forfun?”  Here’s what they told me, starting with the mostpopular activities:

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1. Family activities, specifically children’ssports.  One of my gym buddies put itbest:  “If you have children involved in school sports,every season, your friends (parents) are chosen for you.” Thisincludes soccer, swimming, Little League, basketball, football andgymnastics.  In many cases, children participate, parentsdon’t.  Think “soccer moms.”  In other cases,children participate, parents coach.

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2. Personal sports.  Golf is anobvious example.  Some advisors play basketball. I would put “going to the gym” into this category because it’sexercise and you see the same people on a regular basis.

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3. Religious activities.  It’s thethird of “The Big Three.”  This involves attendingservices, but also mingling afterwards during the coffeehour.  Advisors may be involved in organizing parishevents or helping with outreach programs like the foodpantry.  Most people find it fulfilling.

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4. Spectator sports.  Think seasontickets.  Tailgating.  Spending lots of time atyour favorite sports bar cheering on your team.  You’veprobably got a separate wardrobe for this.

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5. Chamber of Commerce.  Many Chambers have a really full calendar.  It starts withmonthly business card exchanges.  It then moves intocommunity events like races to raise money for charity.

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6. Scouting and Junior Achievement. These are programs for children that have roles for parents (andbusiness professionals).  Scouting in particular, seems tohave its own unofficial “alumni network” in some communities.

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7.  College alumniassociation.  High school counts too, especiallyin close-knit communities.  High school and college sportsare a big draw.  Alumni associations also have localchapters and localized fundraising campaigns.  The “oldschool tie” can be a very tight bond.

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8. Service clubs.  You see signs intown for Lions, Rotary and other service clubs.  Theseoften involve local business people who take on charitablefundraising projects.

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After reading these, you might say: “Where’s the fun?”

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Many agents and advisors define fun differently. Cheering on your child at school sports is fun for some. Tailgating before a football game is fun forothers.   The common factor is the “naturalmarket.”

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In each example, you are part of a group of people who know yourname and often have a high opinion of you.  Do they knowWho you are, What you do and Why you aregood?  It’s probably yes on the first, maybe on the secondand “I need to work on that” on the third.

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Bryce Sanders is president of PerceptiveBusiness Solutions Inc. He provides HNW client acquisition trainingfor the financial services industry. His book, “Captivating the Wealthy Investor” can be foundon Amazon.

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READ MORE:

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You can’t be everything to everyone — howto define your market

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10 commandments of timemanagement

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8 mistakes advisors make when joining aChamber of Commerce

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Bryce Sanders

Bryce Sanders, president of Perceptive Business Solutions Inc., has provided training for the financial services industry on high-net-worth client acquisition since 2001. He trains financial professionals on how to identify prospects within the wealthiest 2%-5% of their market, where to meet and socialize with them, how to talk with wealthy people and develop personal relationships, and how to transform wealthy friends into clients. Bryce spent 14 years with a major financial services firm as a successful financial advisor, two years as a district sales manager and four years as a home office manager. He developed personal relationships within the HNW community through his past involvement as a Trustee of the James A. Michener Art Museum, Board of Associates for the Bucks County Chapter of the Fox Chase Cancer Center, Board of Trustees for Stevens Institute of Technology and as a church lector. Bryce has been published in American City Business Journals, Barrons, InsuranceNewsNet, BenefitsPro, The Register, MDRT Round the Table, MDRT Blog, accountingweb.com, Advisorpedia and Horsesmouth.com. In Canada, his articles have appeared in Wealth Professional. He is the author of the book “Captivating the Wealthy Investor.”