business man balancing on high wire shaped like a W (Photo: Shutterstock)

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Not only do the majority of CEOs say that the coronavirus pandemic poses a large or severerisk to their businesses, but 11 percent say it threatensthose businesses' very survival. That's among the results of aYPO survey of chief executives globally. Asmight be expected, the most pessimistic outlook comes from thehospitality/restaurant sector.

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And while they may not be employed any longer, retirees mightwant to check into what CEOs think the future holds, since businesssurvivals will affect not just how they'll live their lives duringretirement, but also the assets and investments they hold, as wellas the potential for jobs should they decide they need to go backto work.

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Travel and dining out are big deals for lots of retirees, butwith 41 percent of CEOs saying the pandemic could threaten theircompanies' survival, they could find themselves doing a lot moresocial distancing than they intended even after the pandemic ends,having to stay home and cook for themselves.

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Even if they venture out to other regions or countries, the tripmight be a lot tougher than it used to be, with 30 percent ofaerospace/aviation companies also fearing they won't come out ofthe pandemic on the other side.

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Shopping? No joy there, either, with 19 percent of retail andwholesale sales execs fearing the worst.

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And for those seniors who might have to go back to work, theymight not be able to count on either a job at McDonald's or one atWalmart—unless the latter is involved in shipping internet ordersout the door.

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If next year's revenues are down—and the expectation is thatthey will be, by 43 percent of CEOs who expect them to come in morethan 20 percent below where they were at the end of March of thisyear—look out for the effect on dividends, and even stock prices.Employee counts are expected to be lower, too, also by more than 20percent.

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Interestingly, U.S. CEOs are the least likely, at 22 percent, toexpect their total number of employees to be down more than 20percent a year from now—but, as one report said on Monday, the U.S.is only in the "second inning" of the crisis.

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And while 61 percent of CEOs say they expect a U-shapedrecovery—a sharp decline followed by a longer recovery—22 percentare even more pessimistic, expecting a W-shaped recovery—adouble-dip recession and recovery.

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Marlene Satter

Marlene Y. Satter has worked in and written about the financial industry for decades.