woman working on laptop and on phone (Photo: Shutterstock)

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"A rainy day program is a sunny day's program with aponcho."  I remember that from Scout camp onesummer.  It means you adapt to the situation, not sitaround waiting for the situation to change.  Your childrenmight equate staying home with vacation time.  Notyou.  You are an adult.  You must adapt.

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We need 10 commandments for working from home. Here aremine:

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1. Thou must have a plan.  Your timein the office has structure.  You prospect.  Youattend meetings.  You go out and meet clients. You get prompts from your client contact system.  The dayin the office starts with a written plan.  You need onewhen working from home too.  What do you want to getaccomplished?

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2. Thou shalt not forget thou art being paid towork.  Your income might come from severalsources, including trailers.  It's easy to considerworking from home as a staycation.  But if your clientsare paying fees, they are paying for your attention.

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3. Thou must get dressed.  We are inthe world of video calls.  They aren't alloutgoing – they also come in.  Your clients seeyou dressed a certain way when you visit their office or have anappointment for a review.  They see you as aprofessional.  They need to "see you as a professional" athome too.  At least wear pants.

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4. Thou must establish and keep officehours.  Work isn't something that's fitted inbetween household chores are home-schooling yourchildren.  Your calls are likely forwarded. Clients expect you will be available.  You need to remainfocused.  You can only focus on one thing at atime.  Your work day includes time for lunch and coffeebreaks.  These should be part of your work from homeschedule too.

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5. Thou must remember to ring the cashregister.  Working from home is not a holidayfrom doing business.  Clients still have money comingdue.  They should still honor the timetable you agreed onfor additional investments.  If you see opportunities, youshould tell them.

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6. Thou shalt not forget to callclients.  Everyone has been doing it during thisvolatile period.  Calling clients isn't a "one and done"activity.  Some clients will require moreattention.  Everyone should get at least some. Have a schedule of calls.  Your CRM system shouldhelp.

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7. Thou shalt not forget to retrievemessages. You might not be in your office, butmail gets sent there.  Voicemail messages areleft.  People send texts and e-mails.  Some getforwarded home, but you need to know things don't fall through thecracks.  Ask your office manager how you can stay on topof this situation.

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8. Thou shalt not neglect the prospectingpipeline.  It's unlikely you are cold calling,because the DNC list, state of emergency restrictions and otherfactors are barriers.  Also, people might not be in areceptive mood.  But you need to plan for "after thepandemic."  Do you have stale leads?  Clients wholeft?  People with money coming due in the next fewmonths?  Prospects about to retire?  When youreturn to the office you want to hit the ground running.

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9. Thou shalt use social media efficiently.Almost everyone is stuck at home.  They are putting moreattention into social media including LinkedIn.  If theyare attentive, shouldn't you be posting, messaging and sendinginvitations?  Shouldn't you be commenting on posts,accepting invitations to connect and reviewing your LinkedInnotifications?

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10. Thou must not forget to keepscore.  What did you accomplish today? Before you "leave work" make a list.  Your manager mightcall and ask "What have you been working on?"  Also, whenyou review the day's and week's accomplishments, you get a betterpicture of the necessary next steps.

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Unlike the original Ten Commandments, best practices for workingfrom home don't stop at ten!

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Bryce Sanders is president of PerceptiveBusiness Solutions Inc. He provides HNW client acquisition trainingfor the financial services industry. His book, "Captivating the Wealthy Investor" can be foundon Amazon.

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Bryce Sanders

Bryce Sanders, president of Perceptive Business Solutions Inc., has provided training for the financial services industry on high-net-worth client acquisition since 2001. He trains financial professionals on how to identify prospects within the wealthiest 2%-5% of their market, where to meet and socialize with them, how to talk with wealthy people and develop personal relationships, and how to transform wealthy friends into clients. Bryce spent 14 years with a major financial services firm as a successful financial advisor, two years as a district sales manager and four years as a home office manager. He developed personal relationships within the HNW community through his past involvement as a Trustee of the James A. Michener Art Museum, Board of Associates for the Bucks County Chapter of the Fox Chase Cancer Center, Board of Trustees for Stevens Institute of Technology and as a church lector. Bryce has been published in American City Business Journals, Barrons, InsuranceNewsNet, BenefitsPro, The Register, MDRT Round the Table, MDRT Blog, accountingweb.com, Advisorpedia and Horsesmouth.com. In Canada, his articles have appeared in Wealth Professional. He is the author of the book “Captivating the Wealthy Investor.”