collection of head shots of older people of different races and genders (Photo: Shutterstock)

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A report from the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studiesfinds that while savers overall have managed to sock away anaverage of $50,000 (estimated median) in all retirement accounts, that's definitely not thecase for all demographic groups.

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In fact, according to A Compendium of Findings About U.S. Workers,the variations among those groups are pretty dramatic. Whileworkers with an annual household income of $100,000 or more havesaved an estimated median of $222,000 in all household retirementaccounts, those in the $50,000–$99,000 income bracket have onlycome up with about $47,000.

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It's even worse for those who don't even hit the $50,000 mark inannual income, who have only managed to put away a mere $3,000.

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College graduates, as one might expect, have also outpaced theretirement savings of nongraduates, having saved $160,000 comparedwith a scant $23,000. And men of course have outsaved women, hardlysurprising considering the obstacles to savings and income levelsthat women face: Men are looking at retirement cushions of $76,000,while women have only managed to squirrel away $23,000.

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Despite these disparities, the survey reports that 63 percent ofworkers are confident that they will be able to fully retire with acomfortable lifestyle, including 18 percent who are "veryconfident" and 45 percent who are "somewhat confident." In fact, 54percent agree that they are building a large enough retirement nestegg—and interestingly, even 49 percent of part-time workers agreethey are building a large enough retirement nest egg—although 56percent of full-timers say the same.

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That said, the Great Recession has left an enduring mark, with59 percent of workers overall saying they haven't fully recovered;that includes 37 percent who say they've somewhat recovered, 14percent who say they haven't yet begun to recover and eight percentwho say they may never recover.

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On the optimistic side, 41 percent of workers say they haveeither fully recovered (20 percent) or weren't impacted by theGreat Recession (21 percent).

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And even though 80 percent of workers who plan to work afterretirement say it's for financial reasons, they may not be able tofollow through on that plan—particularly since 74 percent ofworkers overall say they're worried about their health inretirement. That includes 51 percent who are somewhat concerned and23 percent who are very concerned.

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Marlene Satter

Marlene Y. Satter has worked in and written about the financial industry for decades.